We cherish the natural landscape but tend to give short shrift to the environment we’ve built, at the risk of dismissing its history, beauty and significance.

By David Berger

GOING, going, gone. That seems to be the status of our industrial landscape.

Up near Port Angeles, the Elwha dams are history. I was glad to see the 100-year-old dams come down and the river flow free again, but sad for the loss as well. The Elwha Dam, on Power Plant Road, spoke of strength and scrappiness, and human sweat. It stretched across the gorge from rock to rock like some Mesoamerican temple.

The weathered concrete is now history, along with the giant tube, the penstock, that lay on the land like a caterpillar and the control room, elegantly designed with slate and steel, and its analog dials that measured force.

Read the full article at the Seattle Times . . . 

More Hall Annex on the University of Washington campus. (Steve Ringman/The Seattle Times)

More Hall Annex on the University of Washington campus. (Steve Ringman/The Seattle Times)